“The 10,000-hours rule says that if you look at any kind of cognitively complex field, from playing chess to being a neurosurgeon, we see this incredibly consistent pattern that you cannot be good at that unless you practice for 10,000 hours, which is roughly ten years, if you think about four hours a day.” — Malcom Gladwell

Citing examples as diverse as The Beatles playing endless gigs in Hamburg before hitting the big time and Bill Gates spending countless hours programming as a child, Malcolm Gladwell claimed in his best-selling book Outliers that it takes a total of 10,000 hours…


When was the last time you complained about a product or service that you use? I don’t mean, mumbling under your breadth about a shoddy customer experience, or moaning to your friends about something you bought, I mean actually complained to the company itself? Actually spoke to someone about your complaint or filled out the dreaded complaint form. If you can remember, it was probably a while ago. If you can’t, then I wouldn’t at all be surprised. You see, whilst complaining is certainly more socially acceptable in some cultures, as a general rule people don’t like to complain. Complaining…


I’ve recently discovered a strangely compulsive TV show from the BBC called Fake or Fortune. In the show a TV presenter and art dealer work with a barrage of art world experts to determine whether a work of art put forward by a member of the public is genuine or a well-made fake. Whilst part of the attraction is of course the big reveal at the end (and the estimated new fortune if it is genuine), the forensic work that goes into investigating a painting, drawing, or sculpture is also fascinating. The tools, techniques and processes used to design and…


Omertà is an Italian word that refers to a code of silence and honour. Synonymous with the Mafia, it places importance on silence in the face of questioning from outsiders. Omertà doesn’t just exist in the murky criminal underworld. Doping athletes such as the now-disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong have also followed such a code, publicly denying any allegations of drug use and ostracising any rider that dares to speak out. Whilst certainly not as dark as the omertà that exists in the criminal and sporting worlds, it feels like a similar code of silence exists in the design community. …


If you were to buy a car tomorrow, which makes would you consider? Assuming that you had a sensible budget (no supercars I’m afraid) would you consider a Ford, a BMW, a Tesla, a GM, an Audi, a Jaguar, a Toyota perhaps? Of the countless makes that you could choose, there is a pretty good change that your shortlist would include some from one of two countries. Two countries that have come to dominate the global car industry: Germany and Japan.

Makes such as BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen, Audi, Honda, Toyota, Mazda, and Nissan produce cars that are popular around the…


We are all designers” has become a rallying cry for some in the design industry. But is this true? Is this the right message to be sending out into the world? Before I answer those questions, I’d like to tell you a quick story. The story begins in a sleepy Spanish town near the city of Zaragoza.

The town of Borja lies an hour to the west of Zaragoza. Like most Spanish towns Borja has a number of Catholic churches, including the impressive Sanctuary of Mercy Church shown below.


As a parent of 2 young children, I get asked a lot of questions. My household will all too often resemble a rather mundane and meandering Q&A session. ‘What’s for dinner?’ is a favourite, as is ‘What are we doing today?’, along with ‘Are we nearly there yet?’ and of course the combative ‘Why not?’ (because I said so).

Children are naturally inquisitive, and being naturally inquisitive they will ask a lot of questions, including a lot of awkward questions. Awkward questions like:

  • What happens when you die?
  • Where do babies come from?
  • Why are you crying?
  • If there are…


Dance at Molenbeek by Pieter Brueghel the Younger

Charles Mackay, a 19th century journalist called itthe Madness of Crowds’. In the 14th century dancing mania broke out across Europe (shown above). Groups of men, women, and children would dance uncontrollably for hours or even days at a time for no apparent reason, only finishing when they succumbed to exhaustion. In the 17th century Holland tulip mania broke out. Driven by manic investors the price of tulip bulbs spiralled upwards and then crashed. At one crazy point, a particularly valuable tulip bulb cost the same amount as an elegant house in Amsterdam. In the 20th century, we…


Imagine taking a symphony orchestra like the one below and splitting it up into a number of separate mini orchestras. Each mini orchestra would have a distinct name, a distinct identify and way of working. Each would have their own conductor, vocalist, violinist, trumpeter, flutist, cello player and so on. Now put them in different concert halls, perhaps even different countries and ask them to collectively play a piece of classic music together. What do you think will happen? Will they miraculously play beautifully together, or will it sound more like a junior school’s first band practice? …


Many things at one point or another have been erroneously labelled as a ‘Game-changer’. Remember 3D TV? That was once going to be a ‘Game-changer’. Last time I checked the game of watching TV hasn’t changed much at all. It turns out that making viewers wear the sort of glasses that Elton John might have favoured in the 1970s takes a lot of the fun out of watching TV in 3D.

One thing that certainly can be described as a ‘Game-changer’ is Agile software development. Agile hasn’t just changed the game of software development, it’s ripped up the rule book…

Neil Turner

Former techy turned UX Jedi from the UK. Checkout out my blog (UX for the Masses) for more about me.

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